Los bibliotecarios participan de la conferencia lenguas extranjeras

Thank you in different languagesDenise Woetzel, Reference/Information Literacy Librarian at Reynolds Community College and Helen McKann, Librarian at John Tyler Community College attended the joint VCCS World Languages Peer Group / FLAVA (Foreign Language Association of Virginia) Conference in Williamsburg on September 26 to promote the VCCS Libraries many world language resources.  Over 700 foreign language instructors from across the state of Virginia including over 70 VCCS foreign language instructors attended the conference.

Instructors throughout the state dropped by the VCCS Libraries table to learn more about the variety of resources available that support each college’s foreign language curriculum including:

  • Print, eBooks, and audiobooks on how to learn a specific language
  • Films on Demand’s streaming video World Languages collection
  • Spanish and French databases available through EBSCOhost
  • Accessing international journal, magazine, and newspaper articles written in a specific language (e.g., Spanish, French) using the EBSCOhost and Factiva databases.

For more information check out the VCCS Libraries online World Languages Resources guide or contact the Reynolds Library.

Goochland Campus in Virginia Gardener Magazine

ImageScott Burrell, agriculture specialist at the Goochland Campus, has just had his 21st and 22nd article published in the February Issue of Virginia Gardener Magazine.

His article Maximum Garden, Minimum Time, features a photograph of the landscaping at the Goochland Campus (look for it on page 26.) His article In the Green Zone mentions Reynolds in the first sentence and features a photograph of Horticulture Head David Seward (page 58.)

The upcoming March Issue of Virginia Gardener will feature an article and photographs of Mr. Burrell’s home garden.

Virginia Gardener is available at the Goochland and Parham Campus Libraries.

Interested in more gardening magazines? Other titles include:

  • Birds and Blooms (Goochland only)
  • Fine Gardening (Goochland and Parham)
  • Organic Gardening (Goochland and Parham)

Reynolds Library also has gardening books for check out.  Goochland has the largest collection, but books can be transferred to any of our three campuses on request.

Don’t know how to place a hold on a book? Check out our video tutorial on finding and reserving books from Reynolds Library’s YouTube channel. Or contact any campus library via phone, email or chat.

Spring is coming!

The Importance of Being Cute: Pet Photography in Virginia 1840-2013 at the Library of Virginia

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Virginians love their pets—and not only dogs and cats!

The Library of Virginia has a new exhibition called The Importance of Being Cute: Pet Photography in Virginia 1840-2013.

The collection includes Victorian cartes de visite, cabinet cards, and original glass plate negatives, along with contemporary images.

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Browse the photos online, or check out the collection in person at The Library of Virginia (800 East Broad Street) through February 22, 2014.

Contribute to the collection! Submit your own pet photos.

Check The Importance of Being Cute site for details. Enjoy the vintage LOLcats – no Cheezburger needed!

Summer is almost here! Switch from this…

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To THIS!

Click the book title to see where you’ll find it at JSRCC Libraries.

Virginia: A Guide to Backcountry Travel and Adventure

House By the Sea   

Are We There Yet? The Golden Age of Family Vacations

Where To Go When, the Americas: North, Central, South America, & the Caribbean

Back Door Guide to Short Term Job Adventures: Summer jobs, Seasonal Work, Volunteer Vacations, and Transitions Abroad

101 Accessible Vacations: Travel Ideas for Wheelers and Slow Walkers

Volunteer Vacations

Summer Blooming Bulbs

Urban Farm Handbook: City Slicker Resources

And the winners are… !

This past weekend, the Library of Virginia announced their 14th annual Library of Virginia Literary Award winners, honoring both Virginia authors of  fiction and authors of non-fiction on a Virginia subject.

Most exciting for us here at JSRCC is the Library of Virginia Literary Award for Non-Fiction winner, Rebecca Skloot, for her book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, a wonderful piece of research and writing on the fascinating human story behind the development of the HeLa cell for cancer research. This book will be featured in our third Around the World Through Books event of the 2011-2012 year on Thursday, March 29th.

Other winners include Earl Hamner, who received the Lifetime Achievement Award, and is the beloved author of  The Homecoming; a Novel About Spencer Mountain.  Belle Boggs, another Virginia native, received the Emyl Jenkins Sexton Literary Award for Fiction for Mattaponi Queen: Stories, a beautifully written collection of short stories set on Virginia’s Mattaponi Indian Reservation and in the surrounding counties.

Jan Karon was the winner of the People’s Choice Award in Fiction for In the Company of Others, one of her many popular novels about Father Tim. In this recent book, he is off to Ireland for a 64th birthday celebration for his wife, Cynthia.

Read these award-winning books and more at your JSRCC Libraries!

What is the oldest book in the library??

Thanks, Jason for your great question! Our staff has been busy working on it and here is what we’ve found:

First we have to come up with a working definition of “book” because in today’s library a book can take many forms- print, digital, audio, and more.

It is difficult to track the oldest print book on the library’s physical shelves by using the catalog. The oldest book by publication date in our library is:

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, which was originally published in 1776- however our copy is a 1937 reprint.

We all agree that the oldest print books we own were published in the early 1900s (original copies, not reprints). Here is one of our oldest original books at JSRCC Library: The South in the Building of a Nation, published in 1909 right here in Richmond.

We also have access to online books with publication dates going back as far as the 1500s. Digitization of ancient books makes these astounding collections accessible with a few mouse clicks on some of the library’s research databases. Look at English Verse Drama to pull up online copies of  dramas from the 16th century and beyond,  including the works of the great William Shakespeare. African-American Poetry, 1760-1900 will provide a reading from early American books of poetry.

Many university libraries own special collections and archives that include very old books (early publication dates and original copies, not reprints). Community college libraries generally do not own the special collections found in college and university libraries. To ensure the well-being of rare books and manuscripts, extensive climate control and security is usually needed.

Now with the ability to digitize these old books, you can read them through your computer. To visit some special collections online in the Richmond area, look at Special Collections at VCU Libraries, University of Richmond, and Library of Virginia. Most of these digitized collections include photographs, manuscripts, maps, and other items, as well as books. Go even further, over to Charlottesville, and you’ll have access to one of Virginia’s best special collections libraries at the University of Virginia.

In a future post, we’ll explore the question, “What is the oldest book in the world?”

Thanks again for a great question, Jason!

February 2011 African American History Month “African Americans and the Civil War”

African American Civil War Memorial, Washington, D.C. by Flickr user Kevin H.

African American History Month began in 1925 as Negro History Week. According to the Library of Congress, this year’s theme,  African Americans and the Civil War, “…honors the efforts of people of African descent to destroy slavery and inaugurate universal freedom in the United States.”

Richmonders have a rare opportunity to study the issues with the year 2011 being the 150th anniversary, or sesquicentennial, of the Civil War. Here are a few links to get you started!

Virginia Civil War.org The General Assembly of Virginia created the Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission in 2006 to commemorate this event.

War for Freedom: African Americans in the Era of the Civil War from the National Park Service.

Civil War Sesquicentennial Events in Richmond from the Richmond Times Dispatch.

African Americans in Richmond from the Valentine Richmond History Center.

Civil War 150 Legacy Project Under “Resources”, click on “Library of Virginia Legacy Project” for a search box to the online collection.

Resources on Slavery in Richmond, Virginia from VCU Libraries Special Collections.

At JSRCC Library:

Be sure to check out the new book display at Parham Campus Library on African American history!

Also learn about more library resources- books, articles, web sites- in the new research guide on African American History for HIS 141 & 142.