Plan Your Valentine’s Weekend with Help from the Library

Today is February, Friday the 13th, but triskaidekaphobia (fear of the number thirteen) is the least of your worries, because tomorrow is Valentine’s Day, and you’re completely out of ideas!

Why don’t you let the library help plan your romantic weekend?

1. Take a look at this Thursday’s Richmond Times-Dispatch on the library’s periodicals shelf. Every Thursday, there’s a weekend insert that gives you the skinny on all the great events going on in the Richmond area over the weekend! Check out info on concerts, theater tickets, and special events. Maybe there’s something perfect happening right around the corner to surprise your sweetie with.

2. Come to the library early to get all of your studying done in time for your big date. If you need a quiet space, you can always check in to a study room for maximum concentration.

movies

3. Pick up a romantic movie! We’ve got plenty of DVDs ready to be checked out that will be great to cuddle up with on this cold weekend.

4. Check out Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child (or one of our many other stellar cookbooks) and whip up a gourmet meal that will knock your valentine’s socks off! (We’ve got another copy at Parham Road Campus too!)

5. Brush up on your date’s favorite hobby, interest, or pastime so you can impress them with your dedication to learn more about the things they love. Stop by the reference desk and a librarian will help you find exactly what you need.

Library to library outreach: Reynolds librarians present to college-bound seniors at Hermitage High School

Denise Woetzel presents to college-bound English classes at Hermitage High School.
Denise Woetzel presents to college-bound English classes at Hermitage High School.

Denise Woetzel, Information Literacy Librarian, and Suzanne Sherry, Parham Campus Library Coordinator, presented the information session “College Libraries and Research: Top 10 Things to Expect” on December 8, 2014 to students at Hermitage High School.

College-bound senior English students participated in the six sessions, and the Reynolds librarians reached almost 400 students during the event. Students were interested in hearing about college libraries and research, especially the cafes in many large libraries. Students also shared their own experiences visiting other colleges.

Hermitage High School is located near Reynolds Parham Road Campus in Henrico County.

Anita Tarbox, one of the librarians at Hermitage High School, hosted the event. “High School students need help preparing and transitioning academically, particularly with the research skills they will need in college. The advice to ALWAYS ASK your professor or librarian will assist our students as they enter the adult world of college.”

Librarians Alison Timm, Anita Tarbox, Suzanne Sherry and Denise Woetzel at Hermitage High School
Librarians Alison Timm, Anita Tarbox, Suzanne Sherry and Denise Woetzel at Hermitage High School

Librarians are committed to helping students succeed in high school, college and beyond. Though this collaboration was one small step for librarians, it was one giant leap for student success.

All photographs courtesy of Anita Tarbox.

 

Goochland Campus in Virginia Gardener Magazine

ImageScott Burrell, agriculture specialist at the Goochland Campus, has just had his 21st and 22nd article published in the February Issue of Virginia Gardener Magazine.

His article Maximum Garden, Minimum Time, features a photograph of the landscaping at the Goochland Campus (look for it on page 26.) His article In the Green Zone mentions Reynolds in the first sentence and features a photograph of Horticulture Head David Seward (page 58.)

The upcoming March Issue of Virginia Gardener will feature an article and photographs of Mr. Burrell’s home garden.

Virginia Gardener is available at the Goochland and Parham Campus Libraries.

Interested in more gardening magazines? Other titles include:

  • Birds and Blooms (Goochland only)
  • Fine Gardening (Goochland and Parham)
  • Organic Gardening (Goochland and Parham)

Reynolds Library also has gardening books for check out.  Goochland has the largest collection, but books can be transferred to any of our three campuses on request.

Don’t know how to place a hold on a book? Check out our video tutorial on finding and reserving books from Reynolds Library’s YouTube channel. Or contact any campus library via phone, email or chat.

Spring is coming!

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running…the Richmond Marathon

The Richmond Marathon is one of the top 15 marathons in the US, and was named America’s Friendliest Marathon by Runner’s World Magazine. On Saturday, November 16 almost 20,000 runners will run (and walk) on Richmond’s streets in the marathon, half marathon and 8k.

Planning on running, cheering, or staying as close to your couch as possible? Here’s some titles from Reynolds Library help you get up to speed on the sport of running.

strides running through history

Strides: Running through history with an unlikely athlete by Benjamin Cheever

Explores the role of running in human history from Pheidippides, who ran the first marathon in 490 B.C. (bringing news to Athens of the Greek victory on the plains of Marathon), to our own soldiers in Iraq today, interspersed with recollections of Cheever’s own decades-long devotion to the sport, and an exploration of the impulse to run, described by Cheever as “the desire, the need, to escape into ecstasy.”

what i talk about

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami (Audiobook)

Equal parts training log, travelogue, and reminiscence, this revealing memoir covers Murakami’s four-month preparation for the 2005 New York City Marathon. Author and runner Murakami is considered to be an important figure in postmodern literature.

born to run

Born to Run by Christopher McDougall

McDougall reveals the secrets of the world’s greatest distance runners–the Tarahumara Indians of Copper Canyon, Mexico–and how he trained for the challenge of a lifetime: a fifty-mile race through the heart of Tarahumara country pitting the tribe against an odd band of super-athletic Americans. This book brought barefoot and minimal running to mainstream culture.

non runner's marathon trainer

The non-runner’s marathon trainer by David A. Whitsett, Forrest Dolgener, and Tanjala Mabon Kole

The Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer is based on the highly successful marathon class offered by the University of Northern Iowa. This is marathon running for real people, people with jobs and families and obligations outside of running.

running for mortals

Running for mortals: a commonsense plan for changing your life through running by  John “the Penguin” Bingham and Jenny Hadfield

You don’t have to run fast or competitively to reap the rewards that running has to offer. What you do need is the courage to start. That is the “Penguin mantra” that has enabled John Bingham to inspire thousands of men and women to take up the sport for fitness and the sheer enjoyment that running brings them.

Details: Click on the images for more info about the book or to place a hold. All books are available for checkout with your Reynolds ID! Descriptions taken from the library’s catalog.

The Importance of Being Cute: Pet Photography in Virginia 1840-2013 at the Library of Virginia

importance of being cute 7importance of being cute 4

Virginians love their pets—and not only dogs and cats!

The Library of Virginia has a new exhibition called The Importance of Being Cute: Pet Photography in Virginia 1840-2013.

The collection includes Victorian cartes de visite, cabinet cards, and original glass plate negatives, along with contemporary images.

importance of being cute 5

Browse the photos online, or check out the collection in person at The Library of Virginia (800 East Broad Street) through February 22, 2014.

Contribute to the collection! Submit your own pet photos.

Check The Importance of Being Cute site for details. Enjoy the vintage LOLcats – no Cheezburger needed!

And the winners are… !

This past weekend, the Library of Virginia announced their 14th annual Library of Virginia Literary Award winners, honoring both Virginia authors of  fiction and authors of non-fiction on a Virginia subject.

Most exciting for us here at JSRCC is the Library of Virginia Literary Award for Non-Fiction winner, Rebecca Skloot, for her book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, a wonderful piece of research and writing on the fascinating human story behind the development of the HeLa cell for cancer research. This book will be featured in our third Around the World Through Books event of the 2011-2012 year on Thursday, March 29th.

Other winners include Earl Hamner, who received the Lifetime Achievement Award, and is the beloved author of  The Homecoming; a Novel About Spencer Mountain.  Belle Boggs, another Virginia native, received the Emyl Jenkins Sexton Literary Award for Fiction for Mattaponi Queen: Stories, a beautifully written collection of short stories set on Virginia’s Mattaponi Indian Reservation and in the surrounding counties.

Jan Karon was the winner of the People’s Choice Award in Fiction for In the Company of Others, one of her many popular novels about Father Tim. In this recent book, he is off to Ireland for a 64th birthday celebration for his wife, Cynthia.

Read these award-winning books and more at your JSRCC Libraries!

What is the oldest book in the library??

Thanks, Jason for your great question! Our staff has been busy working on it and here is what we’ve found:

First we have to come up with a working definition of “book” because in today’s library a book can take many forms- print, digital, audio, and more.

It is difficult to track the oldest print book on the library’s physical shelves by using the catalog. The oldest book by publication date in our library is:

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, which was originally published in 1776- however our copy is a 1937 reprint.

We all agree that the oldest print books we own were published in the early 1900s (original copies, not reprints). Here is one of our oldest original books at JSRCC Library: The South in the Building of a Nation, published in 1909 right here in Richmond.

We also have access to online books with publication dates going back as far as the 1500s. Digitization of ancient books makes these astounding collections accessible with a few mouse clicks on some of the library’s research databases. Look at English Verse Drama to pull up online copies of  dramas from the 16th century and beyond,  including the works of the great William Shakespeare. African-American Poetry, 1760-1900 will provide a reading from early American books of poetry.

Many university libraries own special collections and archives that include very old books (early publication dates and original copies, not reprints). Community college libraries generally do not own the special collections found in college and university libraries. To ensure the well-being of rare books and manuscripts, extensive climate control and security is usually needed.

Now with the ability to digitize these old books, you can read them through your computer. To visit some special collections online in the Richmond area, look at Special Collections at VCU Libraries, University of Richmond, and Library of Virginia. Most of these digitized collections include photographs, manuscripts, maps, and other items, as well as books. Go even further, over to Charlottesville, and you’ll have access to one of Virginia’s best special collections libraries at the University of Virginia.

In a future post, we’ll explore the question, “What is the oldest book in the world?”

Thanks again for a great question, Jason!