Today’s News: Separating Fact from Fiction

This year’s United States presidential election campaign may be remembered for the proliferation of fake, false and misleading news stories especially on social media sites such as Facebook. Viral news hoaxes have been around for many years but 2016 seems to be the year they exploded into the consciousness of the American public. Even typically reliable news sources, whether mainstream or alternative, corporate or nonprofit, rely on particular media frames to select and report news stories based on different notions of newsworthiness. The best thing to do in our contemporary media environment is to read, watch and listen both widely and often, and to be critical of the news sources we share and engage with on social media. To help you in evaluating news stories, Reynolds Libraries has created a guide –  http://libguides.reynolds.edu/fakenews

fake-news

From Open Textbooks to Open Pedagogy

Reynolds librarians, Lynn Riggs and Denise Woetzel, recently attended the annual Open Education Conference right here in Richmond. Open education advocates gathered from around the world to learn about the latest research, development, advocacy, design, and other work relating to open education including: tools and technologies supporting open education; collaborations between teaching faculty and librarians in support of open education; models supporting the adoption, use, and sustaining of OER in higher education; and the role of librarians, faculty and students in advocating for, supporting, and sustaining OER adoption and use.

Lynn and Denise attended a wide variety of sessions on everything from open textbook publishing to open pedagogy. Several sessions that got Denise and Lynn most excited and inspired were:

  • Free + Freedom: The Role of Open Pedagogy in the Open Education Movement, presented by Rajiv Jhangiani from Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Vancouver and Robin DeRosa from Plymouth State University, New Hampshire. Professors Jhangiani and DeRosa explained the What, Why and How of open pedagogy. Open education is broader than open textbooks and savings. It is empowering students to make decisions about the courses they are taking as well as developing content for the course that is both meaningful and valuable to the rest of the higher education community. A fitting quote by John W. Gardner referred to during the session – “All too often we are giving young people cut flowers when we should be teaching them how to grow their own plants.” Some open pedagogy examples identified were: students writing and editing wiki articles; a student-created first-year seminar at Plymouth State University where students were also involved in developing the attendance policy and grading policy. Some of the questions posed during the session were: Why have students answer questions when they can write them? What inspires teachers and students to learn, change, care? How can OER be part of a larger mission related to access and empowerment?
  • It’s Not About the Books: Let’s Think About Open Pedagogy, presented by Christie Fierro, Instructional Designer and OER Coordinator at Tacoma Community College. Ms. Fierro defined open pedagogy as student-created content released with an open license which gives value to the world. Some examples of open pedagogy student projects at Tacoma Community College included: a presentation to the local town council on banning plastic bags; a video promoting and discussing the importance of a local food drive; students writing and modifying chapters for open history textbooks; and students collaborating with the library archivist to create a LibGuide on the history of Tacoma Community College.
  • The Faces of OER: Student Reflections on the Z Degree Experience, this panel discussion included business professor, Linda Williams and four students from Tidewater Community College. Professor Williams began the session by asking, “Whose course are you teaching? McGraw-Hill’s or yours?” Several students reflected that the instructors for their Z degree courses were more engaged with the topics that were taught, and that they themselves felt more connected to these classes than to ones using only traditional textbooks. Students reflected that Z degree courses had a richer bank of resources for them to learn from that just one publisher.
  • Establishing Actual Costs of Textbooks Across Curricula: Data from the Virginia Community College System, presented by Jamison Miller, Kim Grewe, and Amanda Carpenter-Horning. The College Board in its Annual Survey of Colleges estimates the cost per year for books and supplies is $1200.00. This group of doctoral students sought to find out how much the average costs for books are for first year students at the VCCS colleges. They compiled a list of college level, general education, first year courses at each school and checked these against the bookstores’ prices at each college. The estimated average cost of books for these two semesters in the VCCS is $1,110.50 which is less than but close to the national average. Estimated costs for a fall semester’s worth of books at Reynolds is just over $600. For a fall semester at Central Virginia Community College the cost is under $100.

Other session highlights included:

If you would like to talk to Lynn or Denise about the Open Education Conference or discuss possible OER collaborations with the library, you can contact them by email or phone:

Check out these other Open Education Conference resources:

Need a resume that stands out?

Don’t miss this chance to give your resume a boost and land your next job! Attend the Resume Rescue! workshops being held at both the Parham Road and Downtown campuses. This workshop will cover:

  • Types of resumeshired
  • Action verbs
  • What to include and not include in your resume
  • How to tailor your resume to a specific job

You will also learn about the many library resources that can help you with preparing your resume.

Workshops will be held:

  • PRC – Thu, Oct. 30th, 11am-12pm, Massey LTC, Library, Room 103J
  • DTC – Wed, Nov. 5th, 10am-11am, Room 212

Librarians share what happened in Vegas

Hong Wu, Library Director, and Denise Woetzel, Reference/Information Literacy Librarian, had the privilege to attend the American Library Association’s (ALA) annual conference this year in Las Vegas. It was a great conference and we would like to share with you some of the highlights and our top picks from the conference:

Highlights:

Looking for Annual Conference session handouts and slides? If they’re available, you’ll find them by using the Scheduler.

Top Picks from Hong and Denise:

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Need a quick & easy way to cite your resources?

JSRCC Libraries have purchased premium access to EasyBib, a web-based tool for building and managing citations in MLA, APA and Chicago Style.

EasyBib premium access allows you to:

  1. Create a bibliography quickly using the Autocite or Manual entry forms for over 50 source types.
  2. Use features such as footnotes and parenthetical formatting, adding annotations, etc.
  3. Export citations to MS Word or Google Docs. You can also copy & paste or email citations to yourself.
  4. Import citations from popular third-party databases such as EBSCOhost or JSTOR.
  5. Use your iPhone to scan and cite sources with the EasyBib iPhone app. You can then email or export the citations.
  6. Use the Notebook feature to take notes and link notes to sources. Paraphrase, comment and organize your notes.
  7. Register to create your own personal account so you can access saved citations/notes from anywhere.

**On-campus access: No login required

**Off-campus access: You will need to login with your MyJSRCC username and password.

If you need help on using EasyBib:

The library is also offering a free EasyBib Workshop tomorrow, Thursday, November 29th, from 1-2:30pm at the Parham Road Campus Library (Massey LTC Building, Room 103J). To register online, click here or you can just show up tomorrow at 1pm. For more information on this workshop, contact Denise Woetzel at 523-5329.

Guide to Open Educational Resources in Higher Education

Check out a recent guide compiled by Eleanor J. Goldberg and Michael LaMagna which lists and reviews open resources on the Web including full-package courses, videos, repositories, and textbooks. This guide was published in the June 2012 issue of College & Research Libraries News.

Listen to audiobooks on your iPhone or other mobile device

Visit the library’s OverDrive Digital Media Collection web site to download and listen to audiobooks on your iPhone, Windows Phone, iPad, Android, Blackberry or other portable device.  This media collection includes over 1000 titles.  Fiction titles include:  drama, historical fiction, literature, mystery suspense, poetry, and science fiction & fantasy.  Nonfiction titles include: biographies, current events & politics, and history.

To download the OverDrive app for your mobile device visit the OverDrive Media Console web site.

If you need assistance on checking out audiobooks from the OverDrive collection or downloading audiobooks on your mobile device, contact the Reference Desk.