Introducing Kanopy video streaming!

We are happy to introduce Kanopy video streaming to the Reynolds community!

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Kanopy provides  access to one of the most unique collections of films in the world – including award-winning documentaries, training films and theatrical releases – on every topic imaginable. They also have a significant number of art-house and indie films. Total, there are over 26,000 films available.

Kanopy has a user friendly interface that makes browsing and searching for films a breeze — plus Kanopy is compatible with all major browsers.

Like most of our digital databases, Kanopy is available for access both on and off-campus. Just remember that for off campus access, you will be prompted for your VCCS/MyReynolds login credentials. But once you’re in, you can stream any video you wish!

Click here to access Kanopy (it will also be listed as a resource in our A to Z database list).

Happy viewing!

Tiny Free Libraries @Reynolds!

Have you ever found yourself with one too many books?!

Members of the Reynolds Library Staff and the Student Senate partnered up to help you out because WE GET IT!

Beginning in the spring 2017 semester, you’re going to notice a book cart outside each campus library with a sign that looks like this attached to it:

tinyfreelibrary

Don’t over think it – these carts make it easy for you to not only donate books that you’ve loved (or perhaps not loved), but also to take a book that might interest you! Don’t have a book to donate but see one you’d love to read?! No problem. No one’s judging you – just go for it!

This is our way of contributing to the Little Free Library movement going on around the county!

**Please don’t return library materials on the carts!**

Welcome back!

Downtown Campus Library closed for renovations

The Downtown Campus library will be closed from Monday, December 19th to Tuesday January 3rd, 2017 while the exterior windows are being replaced. Books and materials checked out with a due date for next week have already been changed in the library system to have a due date of January 3rd.

The Goochland and Parham Campus Libraries will be open through Thursday, December 22, 2016.

All campus libraries will reopen Tuesday, January 3, 2017.

Thank you for your understanding while we make improvements to your library.

Straight from the Reference Desk:

December 6th is the feast day for St. Nicholas.

Who is he and why is he celebrated?

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  • He gave three bags of gold to three girls to be used as their dowry, saving them from prostitution.
  • Nicholas and the three children:
    • In many paintings and manuscripts, St. Nicholas is often depicted standing next to a tub of three small children. According to the Oxford Dictionary of Saints, St. Nicholas is “said to have raised to life three boys, after they were murdered in a brine tub by a butcher.”
  • He saved three unjustly condemned men from death
  • And rescued three sailors near the coast of Turkey.
  • The Institution of Santa Clause:
    • Based upon his patronage of children, with the custom of giving them presents on his feast day.

Farmer, David Hugh. “Nicholas.” The Oxford Dictionary of Saints. 5th ed. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1978. 385-86. Print.

Today’s News: Separating Fact from Fiction

This year’s United States presidential election campaign may be remembered for the proliferation of fake, false and misleading news stories especially on social media sites such as Facebook. Viral news hoaxes have been around for many years but 2016 seems to be the year they exploded into the consciousness of the American public. Even typically reliable news sources, whether mainstream or alternative, corporate or nonprofit, rely on particular media frames to select and report news stories based on different notions of newsworthiness. The best thing to do in our contemporary media environment is to read, watch and listen both widely and often, and to be critical of the news sources we share and engage with on social media. To help you in evaluating news stories, Reynolds Libraries has created a guide –  http://libguides.reynolds.edu/fakenews

fake-news

Library extended hours: Fall 2016

Student studyingTo help you prepare for final exams,  Reynolds Library will extend its hours of operation during the last weeks of the semester at the Parham and Downtown campuses.

Our extended schedule will be as follows:

7:45 am – 10:00 pm          Monday, December 5th  – Thursday, December 8th

7:45 am – 5:00 pm            Friday, December 9th

8:00 am – 2:00 pm            Saturday, December 10th (Downtown Library only)

10:00 am – 4: 00 pm         Saturday, December 10th (Parham Library only)

7:45 am – 10:00 pm          Monday, December 12th – Thursday, December 15th

7:45 am – 5:00 pm            Friday, December 16th

 

We hope the extended hours will provide you a safe and comfortable learning environment and to offer you the research assistance you need for your final exams and papers.

Good luck!

From Open Textbooks to Open Pedagogy

Reynolds librarians, Lynn Riggs and Denise Woetzel, recently attended the annual Open Education Conference right here in Richmond. Open education advocates gathered from around the world to learn about the latest research, development, advocacy, design, and other work relating to open education including: tools and technologies supporting open education; collaborations between teaching faculty and librarians in support of open education; models supporting the adoption, use, and sustaining of OER in higher education; and the role of librarians, faculty and students in advocating for, supporting, and sustaining OER adoption and use.

Lynn and Denise attended a wide variety of sessions on everything from open textbook publishing to open pedagogy. Several sessions that got Denise and Lynn most excited and inspired were:

  • Free + Freedom: The Role of Open Pedagogy in the Open Education Movement, presented by Rajiv Jhangiani from Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Vancouver and Robin DeRosa from Plymouth State University, New Hampshire. Professors Jhangiani and DeRosa explained the What, Why and How of open pedagogy. Open education is broader than open textbooks and savings. It is empowering students to make decisions about the courses they are taking as well as developing content for the course that is both meaningful and valuable to the rest of the higher education community. A fitting quote by John W. Gardner referred to during the session – “All too often we are giving young people cut flowers when we should be teaching them how to grow their own plants.” Some open pedagogy examples identified were: students writing and editing wiki articles; a student-created first-year seminar at Plymouth State University where students were also involved in developing the attendance policy and grading policy. Some of the questions posed during the session were: Why have students answer questions when they can write them? What inspires teachers and students to learn, change, care? How can OER be part of a larger mission related to access and empowerment?
  • It’s Not About the Books: Let’s Think About Open Pedagogy, presented by Christie Fierro, Instructional Designer and OER Coordinator at Tacoma Community College. Ms. Fierro defined open pedagogy as student-created content released with an open license which gives value to the world. Some examples of open pedagogy student projects at Tacoma Community College included: a presentation to the local town council on banning plastic bags; a video promoting and discussing the importance of a local food drive; students writing and modifying chapters for open history textbooks; and students collaborating with the library archivist to create a LibGuide on the history of Tacoma Community College.
  • The Faces of OER: Student Reflections on the Z Degree Experience, this panel discussion included business professor, Linda Williams and four students from Tidewater Community College. Professor Williams began the session by asking, “Whose course are you teaching? McGraw-Hill’s or yours?” Several students reflected that the instructors for their Z degree courses were more engaged with the topics that were taught, and that they themselves felt more connected to these classes than to ones using only traditional textbooks. Students reflected that Z degree courses had a richer bank of resources for them to learn from that just one publisher.
  • Establishing Actual Costs of Textbooks Across Curricula: Data from the Virginia Community College System, presented by Jamison Miller, Kim Grewe, and Amanda Carpenter-Horning. The College Board in its Annual Survey of Colleges estimates the cost per year for books and supplies is $1200.00. This group of doctoral students sought to find out how much the average costs for books are for first year students at the VCCS colleges. They compiled a list of college level, general education, first year courses at each school and checked these against the bookstores’ prices at each college. The estimated average cost of books for these two semesters in the VCCS is $1,110.50 which is less than but close to the national average. Estimated costs for a fall semester’s worth of books at Reynolds is just over $600. For a fall semester at Central Virginia Community College the cost is under $100.

Other session highlights included:

If you would like to talk to Lynn or Denise about the Open Education Conference or discuss possible OER collaborations with the library, you can contact them by email or phone:

Check out these other Open Education Conference resources: